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Madagascar has an endemic genus, Astacoides, containing seven species.

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The body of a decapod crustacean, such as a crab, lobster, or prawn (shrimp), is made up of twenty body segments grouped into two main body parts, the cephalothorax and the abdomen.

Their disposition towards eating almost anything will also cause them to explore the edibility of aquarium plants in a fish tank.

However, most species of dwarf crayfish, such as Cambarellus patzcuarensis, will not destructively dig or eat live aquarium plants.

The Southern Hemisphere (Gondwana-distributed) family Parastacidae lives in South America, Madagascar and Australasia, and is distinguished by the lack of the first pair of pleopods.

Of the other two families, members of the Astacidae live in western Eurasia and western North America and members of the family Cambaridae live in eastern Asia and eastern North America.

Crayfish, also known as crawfish, crawdads, freshwater lobsters, mountain lobsters, mudbugs or yabbies, are fresh water crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are related; taxonomically, they are members of the superfamilies Astacoidea and Parastacoidea. Some species are found in brooks and streams where there is running fresh water, while others thrive in swamps, ditches, and paddy fields.

Most crayfish cannot tolerate polluted water, although some species such as Procambarus clarkii are hardier.

They are also relatively non-aggressive and can be kept safely with dwarf shrimp.

Because of their very small size of 1.5 inches (38 mm) or less, some fish are often a threat to the crayfish.

In some nations, such as the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, and New Zealand, imported alien crayfish are a danger to local rivers.

The three species commonly imported to Europe from the Americas are Orconectes limosus, Pacifastacus leniusculus and Procambarus clarkii.

Crayfish feed on animals and plants, either living or decomposing, and detritus. In the Eastern United States, "crayfish" is more common in the north, while "crawdad" is heard more in central and southwestern regions, and "crawfish" further south, although there are considerable overlaps.